Sunday, 30 September 2012

Sagrada Familia - Barcelona

Definition of awesome from the Oxford Dictionary

adjective
  extremely impressive or daunting: inspiring awe

Origin - late 16th century 
(in the sense 'filled with awe')

I visited this inspiring building before in 2008 and after seeing some recent photographs online wanted to return. This is a building that takes my breath away with its beauty. It is a true joy. 

I am grateful to share a little of this with you in the following photographs. 

The people standing give one an idea of the scale of the inside of the building. It is awe-inspiring in the deepest sense of the word.

Below, a close up of the towers outside. In one of them, a lift ascends to the top and one can walk down, taking in 'postcard' views through each of  the little openings.


The amazing man who was driven to achieve this work - Gaudi.


He envisioned a building and created a model upside down with wire, chains and miniature sandbag weights


which right side up is becoming a building of astonishing proportions that is not complete and may take decades to reach its full potential. The building is completely funded by the people who visit it to experience Gaudi's pure genius.


Some images of various Gaudi works.

Gaudi had a great mind for detail and was an avid observer of nature in all its glories. His deep fascination led him to create structures mimicking what he had seen. A tree bough with a bole is transformed into the top of a pillar


He emulated leaves in this way


and transformed all he saw into facets of a wonderful organic building that thrills the eyes wherever one looks.

On entering the side doors one's glance is swept upwards towards the heavens by the height and light.



When we were last here in 2008 this whole area was still under construction. You can see all the scaffolding.


Now the whole area has opened up into this glorious space. Light pours down through the ceiling illuminating the area below.

 

A close up of the pattern you can see at the top of the photo above.


The ceilings between the pillars are beautifully decorated, seeming to mirror the pattern


A different ceiling view


and detail of the bottom right of the photo above.


The pillars sweep upward in a myriad of colours, shapes and sizes. Between them are tantalising glimpses of partially hidden beauties.




I love how the colours of the pillars in this section fade from dark to light.


Then I was at the opposite door to where we entered, looking back at this. 


The building has a number of spiral staircases. This one looks like it is based on the inside of a conical sea shell.


This one made me think of a corkscrew which made me smile. This did not detract from its gorgeous lines.


The windows are breath-taking. These are still awaiting their stained glass


while in other places, the light that shines through, sings with a spectrum of colours



which adorn the floors and the pillars




The outside of the building holds many delights too, with amazing sculptures of biblical scenes


In the bottom left of the photo above you can just see this horse's head and legs.



Towers are decorated with colourful fruits


and salamanders slink down the walls.


Even here, the snails have found purchase.



8 comments:

  1. I've always loved Gaudi's work and you have bought it to life with your photography. Sue X

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  2. Thank you so much for posting this!
    I haven't been there since 1975 and I had no idea it has been completed to this extent. Also realy evocative photos.
    I do think that if he had been alive and still involved, there might have been a few more mad Gaudi details! I would have loved a bit of his mosaics. Sari

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    1. You are welcome:) I agree that if he was alive, there would be more mad details!

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  3. Replies
    1. That one word says it all, Dawn:)

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  4. Amazing! I love Gaudi and the photos you've shared are fantastic :)

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    1. Thanks, Tina. I love his works too.

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